Space station crew conduct fire drill

November 29, 2006

NASA says International Space Station crew members conducted a fire drill this week as part of their ongoing emergency preparedness training.

The Expedition 14 crew conducted the Monday fire drill with the support of the U.S. mission control center in Houston, as well as scientists at the Russian mission control center.

NASA said flight engineers Mikhail Tyurin and Thomas Reiter this week are also practicing rendezvous pitch maneuver photography using digital still cameras.

The astronauts will use the cameras to document the condition of Discovery's heat shield during the shuttle's final docking approach on flight day three of the STS-116 mission next month.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: ISS astronauts dodge flying Russian space debris

Related Stories

ISS astronauts dodge flying Russian space debris

July 16, 2015

Three astronauts living at the International Space Station were forced to scramble to safety after what NASA described as a "close pass" by flying Russian space debris on Thursday.

Looking back at the Mir space station

June 18, 2015

The Mir Space Station was Russia's greatest space station, and the first modular space station to be assembled in orbit. Commissioned in 1986, the name can be translated from Russian as "peace", "world", and even "village" ...

Recommended for you

The search for molecular oxygen among cosmic oxygen atoms

July 27, 2015

Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the universe (after hydrogen and helium) and of course it is important: all known life forms require liquid water and its oxygen content. For over thirty years, astronomers have ...

Hubble looks in on a galactic nursery

July 27, 2015

This dramatic image shows the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's view of dwarf galaxy known as NGC 1140, which lies 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Eridanus. As can be seen in this image NGC 1140 has an ...

Fossil star clusters reveal their age

July 27, 2015

Using a new age-dating method, an international team of astronomers has determined that ancient star clusters formed in two distinct epochs – the first 12.5 billion years ago and the second 11.5 billion years ago.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.