Russia raises space tourist tab to $21m

November 9, 2006

It will now cost $21 million for a tourist flight from Russia to the International Space Station.

The $1 million fare hike was caused by increased overhead, a Russian space official told Novosti, specifically materials and components for the Soyuz spacecraft.

Russia has sent four commercial space tourists, three of them U.S. citizens, to the orbital station on board Soyuz spacecraft.

A fifth traveler, Charles Simonyi, 58, a U.S. citizen of Hungarian descent and a major figure in developing Microsoft's Word and Excel software, currently is undergoing training for a 2007 flight.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Don't make us hitch rides with Russia: NASA chief

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