Poll: Climate change worries Europeans

November 21, 2006

A poll conducted across the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and Spain has found Europeans ready to accept lifestyle restrictions to fight global warming.

The poll, conducted by Harris Interactive for the Financial Times, indicated 86 percent of Europeans are convinced human activity is contributing to global warming, with 45 percent saying they believe it will become a threat to them and their families within their lifetimes.

More than two-thirds -- 68 percent -- said they would either strongly or somewhat support restrictions on their behavior to reduce the threat, the Financial Times reported.

However, only about a quarter of those surveyed said they would make significant financial sacrifices to eliminate the threat of global warming.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Island nations seek UN help combatting climate change

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