NASA honors late astronaut Charles Conrad

Nov 08, 2006

NASA says it will honor former astronaut Charles "Pete" Conrad for his involvement in the U.S. space program with the Ambassador of Exploration award.

The ceremony is scheduled for 2 p.m. EST Nov. 18, at The Museum of Flight in Seattle. The event coincides with the 37th anniversary of the Apollo 12 mission of Nov. 14-19, 1969.

The award consists of a sample of lunar material mounted for display at The Museum of Flight, one of the largest air and space museums in the world.

Conrad was the third man to walk on the moon as commander of Apollo 12, the second lunar landing mission. He and lunar module pilot Alan Bean spent 31 1/2 hours on the moon. Conrad also served as pilot of the Gemini V mission; commander of Gemini XI; and commander of the first mission launched to the Skylab space station in 1973.

He retired from the U.S. Navy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as a captain in 1974 and died from injuries suffered in a 1999 motorcycle accident. His wife, Nancy, will accept the award on his behalf.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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