Contact lenses check blood sugar

November 13, 2006

A scientist in Baltimore has developed a contact lens that can provide diabetics with a non-invasive way to monitor blood sugar.

Instead of using blood, Dr. Chris Geddes of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute has produced contact lenses that change color in response to the glucose level in the wearer's tears, KENS-TV in San Antonio reports.

Tears have a tiny concentration of glucose, about 1-10th of that of blood and there's a lag time of about 15 minutes before the eye registers the level.

"We've developed very special molecules that sense glucose at very low levels," said Geddes. "We've incorporated these inside commercially available contact lenses. The test is completely non-invasive and it's continuous."

A person wearing the glucose-sensitive lenses would see a small translucent dot on the left side of the visual field. That dot would change color, warning the patient of dangerously low or high blood sugar levels.

Before the lenses can be commercially available, further testing is needed.

The Baltimore scientists are also working on contact lenses that sense cholesterol levels.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Google contact lens could be option for diabetics

Related Stories

Google contact lens could be option for diabetics

January 17, 2014

Brian Otis gingerly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index finger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glitter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of miniaturized transistors. It's ringed ...

Bovine blood keeps gold nanoparticles stable

May 14, 2013

( —A protein from cow blood has the remarkable ability to keep gold nanoparticles from clumping in a solution. The discovery could lead to improved biomedical applications and contribute to projects that use nanoparticles ...

J&J sales of OTC products plunges 40 pct in 3Q

October 19, 2010

(AP) -- U.S. sales of Johnson & Johnson's nonprescription medicines plunged 40 percent in the third quarter as an embarrassing string of product recalls hurt sales and consumer trust. That, combined with the lingering global ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.