Spy software used in call centers

October 18, 2006

Forrester Research of Cambridge, Mass., said sales of "emotion detection" technology to corporate call centers has reached $400 million annually.

Forrester said sales are still growing for the systems and a related technology known as "speech analytics," The Washington Post reported Wednesday.

The technologies, which were originally developed for eavesdropping, have been employed by customer service agents to get a better idea of customers' moods.

Donna Fluss, principal with DMG Consulting LLC in West Orange, N.J., said emotion detection, which tracks volume and pitch, grew out of voice verification technology.

Fluss said both emotion detection and speech analytics use recorded and transcribed conversations to sort them by searchable words and phrases.

Health insurer Wisconsin Physicians Service, for example, uses the technology to scan automated phone calls for "Medicare" and "confused" to find calls from seniors with Medicare questions.

Roger Woolley, vice president of marketing for speech analytic software seller eTalk, of Irving, Texas, said subtler systems are used to identify when an angry customer is preparing to cancel services.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Speech signal processing technology for smart devices to achieve multilingual speech translation service

Related Stories

Dialect Detectives

April 16, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Technology under development by Pedro Torres-Carrasquillo and his colleagues at Lincoln Laboratory may lead to a dialect identification system that compensates for a translator's inexperience with multiple ...

New technology helps Parkinson's patients speak louder

August 25, 2009

Researchers have developed a new technology that helps Parkinson's patients overcome the tendency to speak too quietly by playing a recording of ambient sound, which resembles the noisy chatter of a restaurant full of patrons.

Recommended for you

Glider pilots aim for the stratosphere

November 20, 2015

Talk about serendipity. Einar Enevoldson was strolling past a scientist's office in 1991 when he noticed a freshly printed image tacked to the wall. He was thunderstruck; it showed faint particles in the sky that proved something ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.