Primitive fish found surprisingly advanced

Oct 18, 2006

Australian scientists studying spectacularly preserved fossils of the lobe-finned fish Gogonasus have discovered some unexpectedly advanced features.

The evolutionary transition from water to land exerts a continuing fascination, but many of the pivotal fossils are incomplete. In a paper published online this week by Nature, John Long and colleagues from Museum Victoria in Melbourne describe the remains of one of the most complete Devonian fishes yet discovered.

Gogonasus swam in the oceans about 380 million years ago. The specimen, discovered in Western Australia last year, was fishlike in many respects, but features of its ear and limbs are surprisingly tetrapod-like, Long said.

The study is to be published in print by Nature at a later date.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How does RNA-induced silencing complex accurately cleave and release target RNAs?

Related Stories

Experiments open window on landscape formation

16 hours ago

University of Oregon geologists have seen ridges and valleys form in real time and—even though the work was a fast-forwarded operation done in a laboratory setting—they now have an idea of how climate ...

Chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels

Jun 30, 2015

Carnegie Mellon University chemists have developed two novel methods to characterize 3-dimensional macroporous hydrogels—materials that hold great promise for developing "smart" responsive materials that ...

Recommended for you

Investigators insert large DNA sequence into mammalian cells

13 hours ago

For the first time, researchers have used a simplified technique derived from a defense mechanism evolved by bacteria and other single-celled organisms to successfully insert a large DNA sequence into a predetermined genomic ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.