Makers say drink burns calories

October 13, 2006

Some New Yorkers expressed skepticism about the hype surrounding a drink that its makers said burns calories as consumers drink it.

Coca-Cola and Nestle created Enviga, a bubbly green tea that scientists said works with the body to create a "negative calorie effect," the New York Daily News said Friday. Available in three flavors, the drink contains green tea extracts and caffeine that its makers said speed up metabolism and increase energy use, the Daily News said.

Swiss scientists tested the product, finding that consumers with near-normal weight burned 60 to 100 more calories by drinking a daily equivalent of three cans, the newspaper said.

"If it's that easy to come up with something with negative calories there wouldn't be so many fat people walking around," one New Yorker told the Daily News.

Enviga will be rolled out in New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia in early November, ahead of its scheduled nationwide launch in January, the Daily News said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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