Study: Lies detrimental for the memory

October 31, 2006

Dutch scientists say people who pretend they can not remember something -- lie about the subject - and negatively affect their real memories.

The researchers at the University of Maastricht say such behavior results in a person eventually unable to remember exactly what, in reality, has occurred, Expatica News reported Tuesday.

Researcher Kim van Oorsouw led the study as part of her doctoral research into amnesia and criminal behavior.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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