Injury severity linked with PTSD

Oct 03, 2006

U.S. scientists say the severity of injuries suffered by soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan can predict posttraumatic stress disorder and depression risks.

Dr. Thomas Grieger and colleagues at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Walter Reed Army Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research conducted the study -- the first to focus on seriously wounded U.S. soldiers.

They found the soldiers' personal rating of their own physical problems, in contrast to objective measures of injury severity by medical personnel, were more significantly associated with development of posttraumatic stress disorder.

The researchers found the development of PTSD or depression seven months after a soldier was seriously injured was associated with the severity of the physical problem one month after the actual injury.

The research appears in the October issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Tobacco firms get partial win over claims on smoking effects (Update)

Related Stories

Research seeks to make robotic 'human patient simulators'

Apr 08, 2015

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check ...

Science and medicine have a 'publication pollution' problem

Apr 03, 2015

The scientific community is facing a 'pollution problem' in academic publishing, one that poses a serious threat to the "trustworthiness, utility, and value of science and medicine," according to one of the country's leading ...

Recommended for you

Breastfeeding protects against environmental pollution

May 22, 2015

Living in a city with a high level of vehicle traffic or close to a steel works means living with two intense sources of environmental pollution. However, a study conducted by the UPV/EHU researcher Aitana ...

When it comes to hearing, diet may trump noise exposure

May 22, 2015

Although the old wives' tale about carrots being good for your eyesight has been debunked, University of Florida researchers have found a link between healthy eating and another of your five senses: hearing.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.