U.S. eases up on mail-order Canadian meds

October 5, 2006

U.S. customs agents will stop seizing medications ordered by mail from Canada, a report says.

The Wall Street Journal said Wednesday that Customs and Border Protection officials were under pressure from members of Congress, who were miffed about constituents whose medications were being intercepted.

Ordering prescription drugs from Canada has become an increasingly popular means for Americans, particularly senior citizens, to cut their monthly costs for medications.

Customs had made little effort to seize small orders of drugs until about a year ago when it turned up the heat on the practice, which is technically illegal despite the widespread availability of Canadian mail-order drugs.

The pharmaceutical industry told the Journal it was disappointed at decision and warned consumers that counterfeit drugs sold on the Internet remained a dangerous problem.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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