Dengue kills at least 27 in New Delhi

October 13, 2006

At least 27 people have died of dengue in New Delhi, as health officials continue to work to control areas where mosquitoes, which spread the disease, breed.

Health officials said the total number of dengue cases in New Delhi was just less than 1,300, the Press Trust of India said. The largest number of dengue cases was reported in the Shahdara area, where more than 150 cases have been reported, PTI said.

Government officials instructed health personnel to step up fogging operations and other means to control the breeding of mosquitoes, which transmit the disease to humans. State officials also asked local government officials to check construction sites and vacant property for possible mosquito-breeding areas, the news service said.

Dengue is an infectious fever found in warm climates, characterized by severe pains in the joints and muscles.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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