Stolen U.S.bone grafts sold to British

September 22, 2006

Bone grafts allegedly stolen in the United States have gone to at least 40 British patients, it was reported Friday.

Twenty-five hospitals were said to have bought the pilfered body parts from a U.S. company, Biomedical Tissue Services. Among the British hospitals named were Guy's, St. George's, Northwick Park and the Royal London plus seven private hospitals.

Biomedical is at the center of allegations that more than 1,000 body parts were stolen by New York gangs and sold for transplants, the London Independent reported.

U.S. police are reported to be investigating claims that managers of the company took the body parts without consent and falsified death certificates in some cases.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended that patients who received a graft be screened for diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, the virus that causes AIDS.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Tracking criminals' biodata is another step towards constant surveillance for us all

Related Stories

How relationships influence health

May 17, 2016

For three years, Whitney Dafoe's world has been a darkened room at the end of a hallway in the back of his childhood home. An insidious disease, one with no known cause or cure, has slowly stolen his life from him, turning ...

Austin, Indiana—the HIV capital of small-town America

May 3, 2016

Jessica and Darren McIntosh were too busy to see me when I arrived at their house one Sunday morning. When I returned later, I learned what they'd been busy with: arguing with a family member, also an addict, about a single ...

Can you think yourself into a different person?

November 17, 2015

For years she had tried to be the perfect wife and mother but now, divorced, with two sons, having gone through another break-up and in despair about her future, she felt as if she'd failed at it all, and she was tired of ...

The DNA thief

May 31, 2013

Evolutionarily speaking, we humans are doing pretty well. Over the last few million years, we've developed big brains, social structures and more recently, culture, cities, philosophy, airplanes and the Internet. So far, ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Cow embryos reveal new type of chromosome chimera

May 27, 2016

I've often wondered what happens between the time an egg is fertilized and the time the ball of cells that it becomes nestles into the uterine lining. It's a period that we know very little about, a black box of developmental ...

Shaving time to test antidotes for nerve agents

February 29, 2016

Imagine you wanted to know how much energy it took to bike up a mountain, but couldn't finish the ride to the peak yourself. So, to get the total energy required, you and a team of friends strap energy meters to your bikes ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.