Experimental Danish ethanol plant built

Sep 13, 2006

A pilot ethanol plant has been built at the Danish Technical University in Lyngby, Denmark, to convert agricultural bi-products into the fuel.

The breakthrough technology is designed to solve the problem of using foodstuffs to create ethanol -- a method criticized as being neglectful towards the world's undernourished population, the financial newspaper Børsen reported.

The pilot plant will use research provided by the firm Biogasol to use agricultural bi-products such as straw and maize stalks and leaves to produce the ethanol.

The plant's operations will provide potential investors with assurance the method actually works outside the laboratory, Professor Birgitte Ahring, Biogasol founder and co-owner, told the newspaper.

Ahring said financing is needed to construct a larger plant to produce at least 10 million liters (2.6 million gallons) of ethanol per year to make the fuel economically viable.

Such a facility would cost about $34 million (200 million kroner), with the money coming from both public and private sources, Ahring said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Start of test with solar energy generating noise barriers alongside highway

Related Stories

Better switchgrass, better biofuel

Jun 18, 2015

Using switchgrass to produce biofuel is one way to decrease the United States' dependence on oil, but growing it and making it profitable can be complicated.

Unlocking the biofuel energy stored in plant cell walls

Jun 10, 2015

By virtue of their chloroplasts, plants are superb harvesters of solar energy. They use it to build leaves, flowers, fruits, stems, and roots. We harvest a small percentage of that energy in the form of food ...

Africa explores cassava potential

Apr 30, 2015

Cassava is a crop that is crucial to food security for millions of Africans but now some countries on the continent are considering the potential of the shrub for industrial purposes, says Wits Professor ...

Virdia gets $100 million to start cellulose ethanol plant

Mar 09, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Despite calls for finding alternatives to using corn to make biofuel, the United States currently has no such commercial biomass-to-sugar processing plants able to do so. That may soon change ...

Recommended for you

Engineers tending to Cameroon's power grid

18 hours ago

EPFL has teamed up with Swiss and Cameroonian partners to address major issues like stabilizing the country's existing grid, improving energy efficiency and developing hydroelectric potential.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.