Baby born from partial uterus

September 14, 2006

A 29-year-old Belgian woman has given birth a little more than a year after having part of her uterus removed during cancer treatment.

The child was born Monday by Caesarean section.

When the woman was diagnosed with cervical cancer last year, doctors at Antwerp University Hospital doctors opted for a "radical trachelectomy" that allows the woman to still become pregnant, Expatica reported.

Doctors removed the cervix and the upper part of the vagina, but the rest of the uterus was left in place. A stitch made at the bottom of the uterus takes the place of the cervix during pregnancy, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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