Artificial heart implants approved in U.S.

September 6, 2006

The use of fully implanted artificial hearts for patients with advanced heart failure was approved for use Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The device approved is the AbioCor Implantable Replacement Heart, made by Abiomed, Inc., of Danvers, Mass.

The system consists of a 2-pound mechanical heart that replaces the diseased heart, a power transfer coil that powers the system and recharges the internal battery from the outside; and a controller and an internal battery, which are implanted in the patient's abdomen.

The device is intended for people who are not eligible for a heart transplant and who are unlikely to live more than a month without intervention.

An Abiomed study of 14 people showed the device is safe and has likely benefit for people with severe heart failure whose death is imminent and for whom no alternative treatments are available. In some cases, the device extended survival by several months.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Bay Area startups developing the high-tech way to make a baby

Related Stories

Bay Area startups developing the high-tech way to make a baby

August 24, 2016

As Silicon Valley technophiles use devices to collect data on everything from how many calories they burn to their fluctuating stress levels and their posture, a group of entrepreneurs is bringing that technology somewhere ...

Implantable device cuts obstructive sleep apnea symptoms

June 10, 2016

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive ...

Recommended for you

New method developed for producing some metals

August 25, 2016

The MIT researchers were trying to develop a new battery, but it didn't work out that way. Instead, thanks to an unexpected finding in their lab tests, what they discovered was a whole new way of producing the metal antimony—and ...

DNA chip offers big possibilities in cell studies

August 25, 2016

A UT Dallas physicist has developed a novel technology that not only sheds light on basic cell biology, but also could aid in the development of more effective cancer treatments or early diagnosis of disease.

Using light to control genome editing

August 25, 2016

The genome-editing system known as CRISPR allows scientists to delete or replace any target gene in a living cell. MIT researchers have now added an extra layer of control over when and where this gene editing occurs, by ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.