States take up global warming fight

August 11, 2006

Thinking the U.S. Congress has dropped the ball, state and local officials from California to North Carolina are trying to do something about global warming.

Their efforts include setting higher standards for greenhouse gas emissions, forcing utilities to generate more energy from renewable sources and establishing cooperative efforts with other countries, the Washington Post reports.

Just last week, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and British Prime Minister Tony Blair said they would explore trading carbon dioxide pollution credits.

Eleven states have set goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 80 percent below 1990 levels by the year 2050 while 22 states along with the District of Columbia are demanding by the year 2020 utilities generate a specific amount of energy from renewable sources.

In North Carolina, a climate change commission has been established to study environmental changes, especially those affecting coastal areas.

A spokesman for President Bush says the president welcomes state and local initiatives because they complement the administration's approach to global warming.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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