Processed meats linked with stomach cancer

August 2, 2006

A Swedish-led study suggests the more processed meat a person consumes, the greater the likelihood of developing stomach cancer.

However, the researchers said there's not enough evidence to call processed meats a cause of stomach cancer, reported.

Led by Susanna Larsson of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, researchers reviewed 15 studies on stomach cancer and processed meats -- bacon, sausage, hot dogs, salami, ham, and smoked or cured meat.

The studies conducted in Europe, North America and South America, and published between 1966 and 2006, involved thousands of people who reported how much processed meat they ate.

The reviewers found a higher intake of processed meats was associated with a greater risk of stomach cancer, said. The researchers reported the finding was most consistent for bacon consumption.

The review is detailed in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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