Korea to sell programmable robot

August 21, 2006

South Korean scientists say they plan to begin marketing an advanced robot that can be programmed by personal computers.

The two-legged robot -- named D2V-ZN -- is to be introduced in October and sold from about $750, The Korea Times reported Monday.

"D2V-ZN can identify its owner with an embedded camera and take some pre-set orders after recognizing voices," D2E Robotics Chief Executive Officer Chung Kee-chull told the newspaper. "It will arguably be the smartest robot in the market. In addition, users can add new motions or functions to the model on their PCs with easy-to-use, customized graphic software. This is a programmable robot."

Chung, also a professor at Daeduk College in Taejon, said unlike current robots "our customers will be able to install new moves on their own."

"In other words," he told the Korea Times, "their imagination will be their only limit."

Chung said he is considering selling the robot through TV home-shopping channels in time for the Christmas season.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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