Home test for intestinal cancer in Britain

Aug 09, 2006

Britain's National Health Service is introducing a home test for intestinal cancer health officials hope will cut the number of deaths from the disease.

The National Independent Bowel Cancer Screening Program, which provides the test, warns the NHS plan has some gaps, the Times of London reported.

"We are not in opposition to the NHS scheme, but people should be aware that in England it will screen only every two years," said Ian Cowie, service director for the program.

The organization also provides free tests only for people between the ages of 60 and 69.

The test kits cost 17.98 pounds ($34).

The NHS announced recently it has drastically reduced the waiting time for cancer screenings for patients referred by their doctors.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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