More female computer scientists wanted

August 17, 2006

The University of Wisconsin-Madison has a new freshman-level computer science program aimed at enticing women to become computer scientists.

The Wisconsin Emerging Scholars in Computer Science was created by Professor Susan Horwitz, with initial grant support from the Microsoft Corp. Now, with National Science Foundation backing, the program is combining two core strategies: direct recruitment of new freshman students from underrepresented groups and parallel team-learning techniques.

Horwitz says those techniques had never been combined in a first-year computer sciences course and the strategy is helping increase the pipeline of under-represented students and improve their quality of experience once enrolled.

"The numbers are terrible for computer science and they have been trending downward so far this decade," said Horwitz, noting that UW-Madison women computer science undergraduates have gone from 11 percent in 2000 to 9 percent in 2005.

"No one completely understands the trend," she added. "Some of it may stem from the dot-com bust and a sense that outsourcing may be threatening future jobs. But we're actually looking at a huge pending shortage in the computing workforce."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Men may feel more threatened by female bosses, research finds

Related Stories

Men may feel more threatened by female bosses, research finds

July 10, 2015

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published in the Personality ...

Recommended for you

Internet giants race to faster mobile news apps

October 4, 2015

US tech giants are turning to the news in their competition for mobile users, developing new, faster ways to deliver content, but the benefits for struggling media outlets remain unclear.

Radio frequency 'harvesting' tech unveiled in UK

September 30, 2015

An energy harvesting technology that its developers say will be able to turn ambient radio frequency waves into usable electricity to charge low power devices was unveiled in London on Wednesday.

Professors say US has fallen behind on offshore wind power

September 29, 2015

University of Delaware faculty from the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE), the College of Engineering and the Alfred Lerner School of Business and Economics say that the U.S. has fallen behind in offshore wind ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.