Study: Cigarettes contain more nicotine

Aug 30, 2006

A U.S. study suggests the nicotine content of cigarettes has increased during recent years, making it tougher for smokers to quit.

Massachusetts Department of Public Health researchers found the amount of nicotine that could be inhaled from cigarettes -- even those labeled "light" -- increased 10 percent between 1998 and 2004, The Boston Globe reported Wednesday.

Nicotine, which can act as either a stimulant or relaxant, is the substance that causes cigarettes to be addictive.

Although the price of a pack of cigarettes has soared to as much as $5 in some areas, smoking rates still exceed 20 percent among U.S. adults.

"We in public health have tried to spend a lot of time figuring out why people don't stop smoking," Lois Keithly, director of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program, told the Globe. "It is more difficult to quit when there is a higher amount of nicotine in the cigarette."

The newspaper said representatives of the nation's three major cigarette manufacturers -- the Lorillard Tobacco Co., Philip Morris USA, and the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. -- declined to comment on the study.

The research is said to be the first to track nicotine levels in seven years.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Rapid response to kids' stroke symptoms may speed diagnosis

Related Stories

Health concerns swirl around electronic cigarettes

Mar 26, 2014

With sales of electronic cigarettes, or "e-cigarettes," on the rise and expected to hit $1.5 billion this year, concerns over potential health risks of using the trendy devices are also gaining momentum and political clout. ...

Recommended for you

Noise from fireworks threatens young ears

2 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The Fourth of July weekend is a time for celebrations and beautiful fireworks displays. But, parents do need to take steps to protect their children's ears from loud fireworks, a hearing expert ...

Many new teen drivers 'crash' in simulated driving task

2 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Around four in 10 newly licensed teen drivers "crashed" in a simulated driving test, suggesting that many adolescents lack the skills they need to stay safe on the road, according to a new study.

New test could predict arthritis drug failure in patients

3 hours ago

A study of 311 patients by The University of Manchester has found that it may be possible to predict early which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients will fail to respond to the biologic drugs given to treat them. These findings ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.