China adds user-friendly wildlife database

August 11, 2006

China has developed a unique wildlife database that is so user-friendly everyone from children to scientists can search it.

Designed for laymen as well as experts, the new database covers more than 3,000 endangered species, the Chinese news agency Xinhua reports.

It features a "fuzzy search" function that allows users to search via words that describe their visual impressions of a wild animal rather than having to use scientific jargon.

According to the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the database incorporates up-to-date information about wildlife conservation departments and natural reserves as well as laws and regulations.

"The database can be upgraded at any moment and information can be shared," the academy says. "It will help promote and standardize the country's wildlife conservation work."

Three government agencies promoted establishment of the database which was developed by Beijing Green Great Wall Science and Technology Company. The Web address for the database was not given.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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