World's first test-tube baby to be a mom

July 11, 2006

Britain's Louise Brown, who was the world's first test-tube baby and paved the way for millions of infertile couples to have children, is pregnant.

Brown, 27, and her husband, Wesley Mullinder, 36, are expecting their first child in January, the Daily Mail reported Monday.

"This is a dream come true for both of us," Brown told the newspaper. The child was conceived naturally.

The couple married in September 2004 and live just outside of Bristol. Brown works as an administrative assistant for a Bristol shipping company and her husband is a security officer.

Brown's younger sister Natalie -- also conceived via in vitro fertilization -- in 1999 became the first adult test-tube baby to have a child of her own.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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