NASA helps visually impaired students

July 14, 2006

Twelve visually impaired or blind U.S. high school students will have an opportunity to explore careers in rocketry as part of a NASA program.

The space agency, in partnership with the National Federation of the Blind, will help the students participate in a weeklong rocket science camp at the federation's Jernigan Institute in Baltimore and at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The camp -- called "Rocket On!" -- offers the teenagers an opportunity to learn about rocketry by developing and building sensors for a rocket to be launched from Wallops.

While at Wallops, the students will assume the roles of NASA mission control personnel as they conduct the mission. Students will participate in various reviews, practice countdowns, final rocket and payload preparations. The launch is scheduled for next Wednesday, with July 20 as the backup date.

The teenagers will use MathTrax software -- a NASA-developed calculator that enables them to visualize data by translating information into an easily accessible text or audio description.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: CubeSat to create a map of water ice on the moon

Related Stories

A giant Pac-Man to gobble up space debris

July 6, 2015

The Clean Space One Project has passed a milestone. The space cleanup satellite will deploy a conical net to capture the small SwissCube satellite before destroying it in the atmosphere. It's one of the solutions being tested ...

Recommended for you

Early human diet explains our eating habits

August 31, 2015

Much attention is being given to what people ate in the distant past as a guide to what we should eat today. Advocates of the claimed palaeodiet recommend that we should avoid carbohydrates and load our plates with red meat ...

Just how good (or bad) is the fossil record of dinosaurs?

August 28, 2015

Everyone is excited by discoveries of new dinosaurs – or indeed any new fossil species. But a key question for palaeontologists is 'just how good is the fossil record?' Do we know fifty per cent of the species of dinosaurs ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.