Journal: Research paper probably flawed

July 31, 2006

Editors of the journal Analytical Chemistry say a published research paper concerning breast implants contained "probably flawed" conclusions.

The manuscript published in the journal's May 1 issue reported women with silicone breast implants have significantly higher levels of platinum in their urine, hair, nails and breast milk.

But the editors said Monday the published study -- written by E.D. Lykissa of ExperTox Inc., in Deer Park, Texas, and S.V.M. Maharaj of the Center for Research on Environmental Medicine in New Market, Md. -- resulted in several letters from scientists expressing concern about the researchers' methods and conclusions.

In an editorial in the current issue of Analytical Chemistry, the journal's editor, Royce Murray of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Associate Editor Catherine Fenselau of the University of Maryland, wrote: "Perhaps the speciation results of this paper are correct -- even though the data are startling. We must say, however, that in retrospect, the evidence that platinum speciation is possible with the experimental conditions described in that paper falls short of this journal's standards.

"Thus," the editorial concluded, "we editors urge that our readers use caution in evaluating the conclusions drawn in the paper."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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