More green PCs expected to go on sale

July 25, 2006

More manufacturers are producing computers that meet the Environmental Protection Agency's green standards.

The EPA reported Monday that companies including Dell and Hewlett Packard are making more products that meet the electronic products environmental assessment tool standard. EPEAT-registered computer products have "reduced levels of cadmium, lead, and mercury to better protect human health, and are easier to upgrade and recycle, in addition to meeting the government's energy star guidelines for energy efficiency," the EPA said.

"These new environmental standards can guide the manufacturing of green computers, laptops, and monitors," said James Gulliford, assistant administrator for the office of prevention, pesticides and toxic substances. "Now purchasers can factor environmental considerations into their decisions when choosing computer equipment."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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