In Brief: Brits to block stolen cell phones faster

Jul 28, 2006

British wireless companies will move faster to deny network access to wireless phones reported stolen.

Friday's announcement is aimed both at phones that are indeed stolen and those reported stolen by their owners for the purpose of making fraudulent insurance claims.

The goal of the new campaign is to render stolen phones useless within 48 hours of being reported stolen, if not sooner. Phones will not only be blocked from their current network but from all other carrier systems as well by using the handsets' International Mobile Equipment Identity number.

The industry group Mobile Industry Crime Action Forum said the performance of the five carriers in shutting down stolen phones will be measured and published in an annual report.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Say it with light: Using LEDs to move data faster

Related Stories

You've been hacked ... do this right now

Jun 05, 2015

The entire U.S. federal workforce may be at risk after yet another intrusion from what security experts believe were hackers based in China. The Department of Homeland Security says that data from the Office ...

Corporate accounts targeted in Dyre Wolf campaign

Apr 05, 2015

A sophisticated and brazen theft operation has been brought to attention this month by IBM Security, which refers to it as the "Dyre Wolf Campaign." It has been active and successful, having stolen over $1 ...

US charges China academics in trade theft scheme

May 19, 2015

US prosecutors have charged six Chinese nationals, including three university professors, with a years-long scheme to steal mobile phone technology trade secrets for Beijing's benefit.

Recommended for you

A bridge to better batteries

2 minutes ago

A major automaker came to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently wanting to better understand battery degradation. After many months of intense collaborative research with a Berkeley Lab battery scientist, ...

FBI chief urges 'robust debate' on encryption

12 hours ago

FBI Director James Comey called Monday for public debate on the use of encrypted communications, saying Americans may not realize how radical groups and criminals are using the technology.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.