Yoga recommended in breast cancer cases

June 5, 2006

A University of Texas study says yoga, India's ancient system of exercise and meditation, helps improve the quality of life for breast cancer patients.

The research done at the university's M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston showed patients who participate in a yoga program during treatment have improved quality of life.

The study, presented by Professor Lorenzo Cohen at the Atlanta meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, was part of a continuing effort to scientifically validate the age-old belief that mind-body interventions have a beneficial impact on the health of cancer patient, the center announced. It is the first to incorporate yoga as part of a treatment plan for cancer patients.

The study was done in collaboration with India's yoga research institution, Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana in Bangalore.

"Cancer and its treatments are associated with considerable distress, impaired quality of life and reduced physical function. This is particularly true for women with breast cancer who receive multi-modality treatment over an extended period of time," said Cohen. "With our studies, we think that we could help ameliorate the treatment-related side effects that accumulate in cancer patients over time."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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