Washington State bars handwritten scripts

June 22, 2006

A Washington state law prohibits the filling of any prescription that isn't hand-printed, typed or electronically generated.

If physicians, veterinarians and other prescription writers want to assign blame for the bill, Dr. William Robertson of the Washington Poison Center is willing to accept it, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer said. He says the law will not only make pharmacists lives easier, but will prevent many drug errors.

The newspaper notes prescription legibility has been an issue across the nation, forcing pharmacists to call physicians to determine what medications should be dispensed. Some pharmacists say they often must also call physicians' offices to obtain such information as patients' names, dosage requirements and addresses.

Robertson said random samples of 6,000 prescriptions were collected across his state. When pharmacists, physician assistants and others tested the samples, they found 24 percent to 32 percent of the prescriptions were illegible, the Post-Intelligencer said.

Observers note, however, the entire flap will eventually become moot as an increasing number of physicians switch to computer-generated scrips.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Wireless network in hospital monitors vital signs

Related Stories

Pregnant? Get a flu shot -- but it may be a hassle

September 28, 2009

(AP) -- It's hard for pregnant women to escape the message: You're at extra risk from swine flu - it could trigger premature labor, hospitalize you for weeks, even kill you - so be among the first in line for vaccine next ...

Recommended for you

Researchers build bacteria's photosynthetic engine

July 29, 2015

Nearly all life on Earth depends on photosynthesis, the conversion of light energy into chemical energy. Oxygen-producing plants and cyanobacteria perfected this process 2.7 billion years ago. But the first photosynthetic ...

Scientists unlock secrets of stars through aluminium

July 29, 2015

Physicists at the University of York have revealed a new understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, providing insight into the role massive stars play in the evolution of the Milky Way and the origins of the Solar System.

Yarn from slaughterhouse waste

July 29, 2015

ETH researchers have developed a yarn from ordinary gelatine that has good qualities similar to those of merino wool fibers. Now they are working on making the yarn even more water resistant.

Studies reveal details of error correction in cell division

July 29, 2015

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.