University of Missouri gets nano contract

June 27, 2006

The University of Missouri-Columbia has been given a $4.79 million Army contract to develop nanotechnologies that will improve military capabilities.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Shubhra Gangopadhyah said the three-year contract is for development of numerous devices that will be used to power warheads, rockets, missiles and guns. The devices resemble electric circuits.

Gangopadhyah, well known for working with tiny explosive materials, was selected by Army officials because her research in "dual-use," incorporating microchip-based technology with nanotechnology.

Fusing both technologies generates a powerful reaction, producing millions of shockwaves that can be used to initiate explosions or detect explosives.

Nanotechnology works with microscopic particles the size of atoms.

"Our goal is to use microchip technology to make smaller and better controlled warheads and munitions systems," said Gangopadhyah, who also heads MU's International Center for Nano/Micro Systems and Nanotechnology.

The first project, due for completion within a year, calls for the development of devices that generate sufficient temperature, pressure and combustion to propel a warhead or rocket via a microchip.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Microplotter system prints DNA, proteins, live cells on a range of fragile materials

Related Stories

Iran mastered critical steps to build nuke: report

November 7, 2011

The Iranian government has mastered the critical steps needed to build a nuclear weapon after receiving assistance from foreign scientists, The Washington Post reported late Sunday.

Google chairman heading to North Korea

January 3, 2013

(AP)—When he lands in North Korea, even Google's executive chairman will likely have to relinquish his smartphone, leaving him disconnected from the global information network he helped build.

NKorea says satellite 'failed to enter into orbit'

April 13, 2012

(AP) -- North Korea's widely condemned rocket splintered into pieces over the Yellow Sea soon after takeoff Friday, an embarrassing end to a launch that Pyongyang had infused with national pride during a week of high-level ...

Recommended for you

Mathematicians identify limits to heat flow at the nanoscale

November 24, 2015

How much heat can two bodies exchange without touching? For over a century, scientists have been able to answer this question for virtually any pair of objects in the macroscopic world, from the rate at which a campfire can ...

New sensor sends electronic signal when estrogen is detected

November 24, 2015

Estrogen is a tiny molecule, but it can have big effects on humans and other animals. Estrogen is one of the main hormones that regulates the female reproductive system - it can be monitored to track human fertility and is ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.