Sweden's Bocksten Man on display

June 3, 2006

Sweden's Bocksten Man, found 70 years ago and believed to have lived in the 14th century, is on display at the Länsmuseet in Varberg.

The skeletal remains were found in 1936 in a bog south of Gothenburg, Sweden. The skull was so ancient, it was difficult to determine how the man may have appeared, the Swedish newspaper The Local reported.

Professor Claes Lauritzen, using a copy of the skull, had doll maker Oscar Nilsson reconstruct the face using clay and silicon. Researchers also used skills similar to those used in forensics to get an idea of what the man looked like and the conditions in which he might have lived.

The Bocksten Man is believed to have been a man of high social standing, evident from his cloak, wool pants and coned head. Many believe he died as a result of multiple blows to the head.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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