Science panel calls for greater openness

June 10, 2006

An independent advisory panel finds that inconsistent communication policy among U.S. government departments threatens the quality of scientific research.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., asked the National Science Board to review policies after scientists with NASA and other agencies complained of efforts to prevent open discussion of global warming and other politically charged issues.

The board recommended that the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy work out a strategy for communicating information to the public that discourages the "the intentional or unintentional suppression or distortion of research findings," The New York Times reported.

Benjamin Fallon, a spokesman for the office, told the Times in an e-mail that the administration sees no need for a "one-size fits all" policy.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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