Samsung Intros First 1.98'' LCD to Achieve VGA with Amorphous Silicon

Jun 08, 2006
Samsung Intros First 1.98'' LCD to Achieve VGA with Amorphous Silicon

Samsung Electronics announced today that it has developed the industry's first 1.98” LCD panel to achieve VGA resolution, using the company's amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology. Mobile phones equipped with this new, display will be able to show Windows screens and documents with the same VGA quality that is provided by most desktop or notebook PCs.

The new mobile LCD panel is being displayed at the SID 2006 Conference in San Francisco June 6 through June 8. The user will be able to enjoy the best quality mobile TV images, with delineation of visual details as small as 63 microns — half the average width of a human hair (120 microns). A typical 40” HD LCD TV has 40 pixels per square inch, while the new 1.98” LCD panel has10 times as many, or 400 ppi.

Samsung has achieved a wide range of technology improvements in the development of its new 1.98” VGA LCD. The company's proprietary, amorphous silicon gates are built into the LCD panel to achieve maximum efficiency in design and module processing. Samsung also has achieved 16 million colors, and the new LCD can accommodate the extremely fast data transmission rates required today.

The new 1.98” VGA LCD is a transmissive LCD with liquid crystals that provide a wide viewing angle. The images are bright (250 nit) and clean (contrast ratio of 300 to 1). It is well suited for mobile products that require high picture quality.

Source: Samsung

Explore further: Supercomputers a hidden power center of Silicon Valley

Related Stories

Q&A: Why are antibiotics used in livestock?

11 hours ago

Wal-Mart, the world's biggest retailer, is the latest company to ask its suppliers to curb the use of antibiotics in farm animals. Here's a rundown of what's driving the decision: ...

Recommended for you

'Deep web search' may help scientists

8 hours ago

When you do a simple Web search on a topic, the results that pop up aren't the whole story. The Internet contains a vast trove of information—sometimes called the "Deep Web"—that isn't indexed by search ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.