First Rockies natural gas report issued

June 16, 2006

The U.S. Wildlife Conservation Society has released the first-year results of a study on how natural gas development in the Rockies might affect wildlife.

The report represents initial data from a five-year WCS study funded by the Shell Exploration & Production Co., Ultra Resources Inc. and other natural gas developers. The study focuses on how such development influences wildlife in the Rocky Mountains -- a region that serves as a critical wintering ground for pronghorn antelope, the focus species of the study.

"The Upper Green River Valley Basin contains some of the nation's most spectacular wildlife, including pronghorn, one of the most prominent and wide-ranging species of the western United States," said WCS researcher Joel Berger, co-author of the study with WCS scientists Jon Beckmann and Kim Murray Berger.

Joel Berger says the study is designed to provide empirical data concerning management of the valley's resources and serve as a model to balance wildlife needs with energy development across the Rocky Mountain region.

The Wildlife Conservation Society is based at the Bronx Zoo in New York City.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Saving the last groups of wild Sumatran rhinoceros

Related Stories

Saving the last groups of wild Sumatran rhinoceros

September 16, 2015

Researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Wildlife Conservation Society's (WCS) Indonesia Program carried out an island-wide survey of the last wild population of Sumatran rhinoceros, and now recommend ...

One of world’'s rarest turtles heading back to the wild

July 15, 2015

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and the Royal Government of Cambodia's Fisheries Administration announced today that 21 captive-raised southern river terrapins have been released back into their native habitat in southwest ...

Ecologists develop new method for mapping poaching threats

May 22, 2015

Ecologists from the University of York, together with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA), have developed a new method to better identify where poachers operate in protected areas.

Recommended for you

History shows more big wildfires likely as climate warms

October 5, 2015

The history of wildfires over the past 2,000 years in a northern Colorado mountain range indicates that large fires will continue to increase as a result of a warming climate, according to new study led by a University of ...

Predictable ecosystems may be more fragile

October 7, 2015

When it comes to using our natural resources, human beings want to know what we're going to get. We expect clean water every time we turn on the tap; beaches free of algae and bacteria; and robust harvests of crops, fish ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.