Microsoft launches new ABACUS smart watch

June 14, 2006
Microsoft launches new ABACUS smart watch

Microsoft's Smart Personal Objects Technology initiative released its next generation of Smart Watches for MSN Direct.

The ABACUS Smart Watch 2006 has a thinner bezel and more stylish bands from Fossil Inc. but also doubles the storage capacity of previous watches and improves upon download speed of content from MSN Direct Channels.

As part of the MSN Direct Smart Plan ($39.95 value), content includes news, weather, sports scores, movie times, traffic and horoscopes, among other things; and for $20 more per year consumers can receive MSN Messenger personal messages and Microsoft Office Outlook calendar sync, according to Microsoft.

The smart phone is available online at, and for $179 and includes a one-year subscription to the MSN Direct Smart Plan.

"This new generation of Smart Watches gives wearers greater choice, convenience and value," said Eric Lang, general manager of the SPOT initiative at Microsoft. "With the ABACUS Smart Watch 2006, we not only refined the aesthetics, but also significantly enhanced the technology within the watch and are pleased with this latest extension of the SPOT vision."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Watches that compute are the next small thing in technology

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Internet giants race to faster mobile news apps

October 4, 2015

US tech giants are turning to the news in their competition for mobile users, developing new, faster ways to deliver content, but the benefits for struggling media outlets remain unclear.

Radio frequency 'harvesting' tech unveiled in UK

September 30, 2015

An energy harvesting technology that its developers say will be able to turn ambient radio frequency waves into usable electricity to charge low power devices was unveiled in London on Wednesday.

Professors say US has fallen behind on offshore wind power

September 29, 2015

University of Delaware faculty from the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE), the College of Engineering and the Alfred Lerner School of Business and Economics say that the U.S. has fallen behind in offshore wind ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.