FEI systems selected for Russian center

June 5, 2006

The FEI Company announced Monday that three of its systems have been selected as core enabling tools for a new Russian nanotechnology facility.

The systems -- Tecnai T12, T30 transmission electron microscopes, and Quanta 3D DualBeam -- will be used at Russia's new state-of-the-art Pilot Scientific and Technical Center of Excellence for Nanotechnology Development.

The multimillion dollar center in Moscow, opened June 3, 2006, is being funded by the Russian Federation and aims to give researchers in the country access to advanced nanoscale imaging, analysis and manipulation capabilities.

While the Tecnai T12 and T30 systems have been purchased by the Russian center, the Quanta 3D DualBeam is being supplied by Systems for Microscopy and Analysis, FEI's sales agent in Russia, FEI said.

FEI Executive Vice President of Sales and Service Bob Gregg and the U.S. undersecretary of commerce for technology were both at hand in the opening ceremonies of the center.

"We at FEI are honored to be selected as a partner to support the work of Russia's new world-class center of excellence," Gregg said. "We are also proud that we are not only providing some of the best enabling tools available, but that we are helping the world's leading researchers and developers create new products and technologies. These advances are expected to address key global issues and to enhance our quality of life around the globe."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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