Consumers and commercials studied

June 20, 2006

U.S. scientists say the more consumers are absorbed in the narrative flow of a story, called transportation, the less likely they'll respond well to ads.

That finding might have interesting implications for advertisers, many of whom pay more for "premium" ad placement that may actually deter consumers.

"Media create the audience for most advertising. Consumers come to a medium for its content," said Jing Wang of University of Iowa and Bobby Calder of Northwestern University. "If the ad interrupts the transportation experience, this in itself creates a negative experience associated with the ad."

And when the story is personally relevant to the reader or viewer, the effects are increased, say the scientists. Conversely, ads relevant to the reader's personal goals are deemed the most intrusive. But the researchers also found absorption in a story can enhance the effect of advertisements -- if they ads appear after the story has ended.

The study is detailed in the September issue of the Journal of Consumer Research.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Report on 'bruising' Amazon workplace sparks debate

Related Stories

Finding the 'conservacion' in conservation genetics

August 5, 2015

A recently published special issue of the Journal of Heredity focuses on case studies of real-world applications of conservation genetics in Latin America, from nabbing parrot smugglers to exposing fraudulent fish sales.

Oculus debuts virtual reality film 'Henry'

July 29, 2015

Oculus is hedging its bets that an adorable critter named Henry can help convince consumers—and Hollywood—about the viability of virtual reality as a storytelling medium.

Recommended for you

Early human diet explains our eating habits

August 31, 2015

Much attention is being given to what people ate in the distant past as a guide to what we should eat today. Advocates of the claimed palaeodiet recommend that we should avoid carbohydrates and load our plates with red meat ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.