British group seeks ban on EU egg imports

June 15, 2006

Britain's Egg Industry Council is asking that country stop importing eggs from certain European Union countries because of salmonella threat.

The call comes in the wake of a new Europe-wide study which uncovered the extent of contamination on EU farms, reports Sky News.

In the study done by the European Food Safety Authority, British farms ranked the third lowest with 12 percent of farms tested showing contamination, the report said. But other countries had far higher levels.

The report said the study found salmonella on 79.5 percent of the premises tested in Portugal, 77.2 percent in Poland and 73.2 percent in Spain.

"We believe that imports of eggs into the U.K. should be banned unless they have been produced to the standards required by the British Lion scheme, including vaccination of hens against salmonella, a best-before date on every egg and full traceability of eggs, hens and feed," said the head of the British egg council.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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