Biologists want to save trout with poison

Jun 19, 2006

For the fifth time, biologists are reportedly proposing to poison a remote Sierra stream to restore what might be America's rarest trout.

The controversial plan by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service and California Department of Fish and Game, involves the use of a chemical to clear non-native fish from Silver King Creek south of Lake Tahoe, the Reno (Nev.) Gazette-Journal reported Monday.

Eliminating the non-native fish would allow the threatened Paiute cutthroat trout to flourish in its native habitat, but opponents concerned about use of the chemical rotenone in the mountain creek have blocked the project each of the last four summers.

For the latest attempt, the federal government plans to present a $125,000 full environmental impact statement to show the project can succeed without any significant environmental problems.

Opponents call the proposal a "very risky undertaking."

"Basically, rotenone is designed to sterilize the stream, not just the target fish," Patty Clary, executive director of Californians for Alternatives to Toxics, told the Gazette-Journal. "It wipes out everything. You don't know what you're losing that won't ever come back again."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Pact with devil? California farmers use oil firms' water

Related Stories

Are Montana's invasive fish in for a shock?

Oct 06, 2014

A new paper from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Montana State University, Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, and the U.S. Geological Survey looks at the feasibility of electrofishing to selectively ...

Recommended for you

Gimmicks and technology: California learns to save water

Jul 03, 2015

Billboards and TV commercials, living room visits, guess-your-water-use booths, and awards for water stinginess—a wealthy swath of Orange County that once had one of the worst records for water conservation ...

Cities, regions call for 'robust' world climate pact

Jul 03, 2015

Thousands of cities, provinces and states from around the world urged national governments on Thursday to deliver a "robust, binding, equitable and universal" planet-saving climate pact in December.

Will climate change put mussels off the menu?

Jul 03, 2015

Climate change models predict that sea temperatures will rise significantly, including in the tropics. In these areas, rainfall is also predicted to increase, reducing the salt concentration of the surface ...

As nations dither, cities pick up climate slack

Jul 02, 2015

Their national governments hamstrung by domestic politics, stretched budgets and diplomatic inertia, many cities and provinces have taken a leading role—driven by necessity—in efforts to arrest galloping ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.