Beware of exploding laptops

June 29, 2006
A businessman uses his laptop computer

Exploding laptops could be deadly, a Canadian research group reported Thursday.

The Ontario-based Info-Tech Research Group pointed out that computer batteries on laptops have caused several product recalls over the past year and pose a threat to personal safety, especially when traveling by air.

"The most recent event we're aware of involved a Dell laptop exploding and bursting into flames at a business meeting in Osaka, Japan," said senior analyst Carmi Levy. "The potential for an in-flight incident of this nature when travelers are using battery power for portable PCs certainly exists. Everyone worries about covert explosives being taken on board planes, but what about the average laptop that could be just as dangerous?"

In April, Hewlett-Packard recalled 15,700 HP and Compaq notebook computer batteries, while Dell recalled about 22,000 notebook computer batteries last December, and Apple Computer recalled 128,000 batteries for its PowerBook G4 and iBook G4 laptops this spring.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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