AMD expected to announce new chip plant

June 23, 2006

Advanced Micro Devices was expected to announce late Friday that it would build a new semiconductor plant in upstate New York.

The news conference reported by the Albany Times Union was likely called to confirm that AMD would locate the plant in a technology park outside the capital city with the assistance of more than $1 billion in government incentives.

The announcement comes a day after chip rival Intel announced that it had begun high-volume production of 65-nanometer semiconductors cut from 300-mllimeter wafers at its new plant in Ireland.

The Dublin-area facility is the third Intel plant to produce 65nm chips using the larger cost-saving 300mm wafers.

The company said in a news release that the increased production comes at a time when the chip industry is racing to get their 65nm products to the market.

"Intel's ability to ramp advanced 65nm silicon technology into high-volume production in three factories clearly sets us apart," said Intel President Paul Otellini. "The combination of 65nm technology and Intel's new Core microarchitecture changes the game in terms of the benefits we can provide our customers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Intel Opens Leading-Edge 65nm, 300mm High-Volume Wafer Manufacturing Facility In Arizona

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