New virus identified on Yahoo! Messenger

May 22, 2006
Yahoo logo

Users of Yahoo! Messenger beware, a new worm is on the loose.

Researchers at FaceTime Security Labs have identified a new threat -- yhoo32.explr, a self-propagating worm that installs "Safety Browser" and hijacks the Internet Explorer homepage, leading users to a site that puts spyware on their PCs, said the security research firm.

Moreover, the worm spreads the infection to all contacts within an individual's messenger service by sending a Web site link that loads a command file onto the user's PC and installs the Safety Browser.

This is the first recorded incidence of malware installing its own Web browser on a PC without the user's permission, according to FaceTime Security Labs.

"This is one of oddest and more insidious pieces of malware we have encountered in years," said Tyler Wells, senior director of research at FaceTime Security Labs. "This is the first instance of a complete web browser hijack without the user's awareness. Similar 'rogue' browsers, such as 'Yapbrowser,' have demonstrated the potential for serious damage by directing end-users to potentially illegal or illicit material. 'Rogue' browsers seem to be the hot new thing among hackers."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers find vulnerabilities in use of certificates for Web security

Related Stories

Apple App Store suffers 'worst' malware attack

September 21, 2015

Hackers infiltrated the vaunted Apple ecosystem by injecting malicious software into popular Chinese mobile apps, potentially affecting hundreds of millions of users and raising security concerns as the US tech giant prepares ...

Recommended for you

The ethics of robot love

November 25, 2015

There was to have been a conference in Malaysia last week called Love and Sex with Robots but it was cancelled. Malaysian police branded it "illegal" and "ridiculous". "There is nothing scientific about sex with robots," ...

Tandem solar cells are more efficient

November 23, 2015

Stacking two solar cells one over the other has advantages: Because the energy is "harvested" in two stages, and overall the sunlight can be converted to electricity more efficiently. Empa researchers have come up with a ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.