Station Crew Completes Orbital Adjustment

May 8, 2006
The International Space Station

Crew members Pavel Vinogradov and Jeff Williams successfully raised the International Space Station's orbit last Thursday by firing the engines of the Russian Progress 21 cargo craft currently docked to the facility.

Mission controllers had determined the orbital adjustment - which raised the altitude of the station by about 1.7 miles - was a desirable maneuver to ease rendezvous conditions slightly for Russian spacecraft and to test the action in case the station needed to be moved out of danger of colliding with orbiting debris.

A previous orbital adjustment attempt last month had to be canceled because of a technical problem.

Meanwhile, commander Vinogradov and flight engineer Williams have been performing various scheduled experiments aboard the station, and they participated in an interactive televised educational event, also last Thursday morning, involving Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and NASA's Explorer Schools program.

Copyright 2006 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

Explore further: NASA robotic servicing demonstrations continue onboard the space station

Related Stories

How could we destroy the moon?

July 17, 2015

In the immortal words of Mr. Burns, "ever since the beginning of time, man has wished to destroy the sun." Your days are numbered, sun.

ISS astronauts dodge flying Russian space debris

July 16, 2015

Three astronauts living at the International Space Station were forced to scramble to safety after what NASA described as a "close pass" by flying Russian space debris on Thursday.

Curiosity Mars rover tracks sunspots

July 13, 2015

While busily investigating bedrock types on Mars' Mount Sharp and preparing for a drill test, NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has also been looking up frequently to monitor sunspots on the face of the sun that is turned away ...

Recommended for you

The search for molecular oxygen among cosmic oxygen atoms

July 27, 2015

Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the universe (after hydrogen and helium) and of course it is important: all known life forms require liquid water and its oxygen content. For over thirty years, astronomers have ...

Hubble looks in on a galactic nursery

July 27, 2015

This dramatic image shows the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's view of dwarf galaxy known as NGC 1140, which lies 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Eridanus. As can be seen in this image NGC 1140 has an ...

Fossil star clusters reveal their age

July 27, 2015

Using a new age-dating method, an international team of astronomers has determined that ancient star clusters formed in two distinct epochs – the first 12.5 billion years ago and the second 11.5 billion years ago.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.