Obesity concerns result in milk ban

May 26, 2006

Whole milk is to be banned from British schools in the campaign against childhood obesity, allowing for the serving of only skimmed or semi-skimmed milk.

The new measure is effective September at all state schools and will apply to milk served during school lunches and at break times, and to cartons sold in vending machines, reports The Times of London.

One dairy farmer was quoted as saying, "I find it totally unacceptable that full milk is now being linked with junk food."

The milk industry believes the move is the result of consumer concerns about children's health.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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