Moistureloc removed from worldwide market

May 15, 2006

MoistureLoc contact lens solution was permanently removed from worldwide markets, effective immediately, Bausch & Lomb announced Monday.

Health authorities in Hong Kong, Singapore and the United States reported that the MoistureLoc formula was used by many of the contact lens wearers who were treated for a rare eye infection called Fusarium keratitis. Bausch & Lomb launched an investigation to determine the cause of the infection.

Bausch & Lomb Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ronald L. Zarrella said the probe found "no evidence of product contamination, tampering, counterfeiting or sterility failure." He said, however, there may be some aspect of the MoistureLoc formula increasing the risk "in unusual circumstances."

"We are continuing to investigate this link, but in the meantime, we're taking the most responsible action in the interests of our customers by discontinuing the MoistureLoc formula," he said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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