Study links plankton blooms to earthquakes

May 9, 2006

A team of U.S. and Indian scientists says it has found a link between concentrations of chlorophyll in coastal waters and the occurrence of earthquakes.

The increases in chlorophyll are the result of blooms of plankton, which use chlorophyll to convert solar energy into chemical energy via photosynthesis, the BBC reported Tuesday.

The scientists analyzed satellite data from coastal areas near the epicenters of four recent earthquakes and determined chlorophyll blooms might provide early warning concerning an impending earthquake.

The researchers theorize the movement of plate tectonics creates conditions in which plankton thrive in proximity to an impending earthquake, the BBC said.

The research is detailed in the journal Advances in Space Research.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Shift in Arabia sea plankton may threaten fisheries: Growing 'dead zone' could short-circuit food chain

Related Stories

Lake Erie: Warmest in summer, coldest in winter

September 17, 2013

When it's 20 below, Dr. Michael Twiss, professor at Clarkson University, has been known to clear the snow and lie down on the thick ice of a frozen lake and stare up at the Northern Lights. But for all his winter preparedness, ...

Sea surface temperatures reach highest level in 150 years

April 26, 2013

Sea surface temperatures in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem during 2012 were the highest recorded in 150 years, according to the latest Ecosystem Advisory issued by NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC). ...

Huge phytoplankton bloom in ice-covered waters discovered

June 7, 2012

A team of researchers, including scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), discovered a massive bloom of phytoplankton beneath ice-covered Arctic waters. Until now, sea ice was thought to block sunlight ...

Recommended for you

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' happen?

October 9, 2015

A researcher from the University of Southampton has produced a scientific study of the climate scenario featured in the disaster movie 'The Day After Tomorrow'.

Horn of Africa drying ever faster as climate warms

October 9, 2015

The Horn of Africa has become increasingly arid in sync with the global and regional warming of the last century and at a rate unprecedented in the last 2,000 years, according to new research led by a University of Arizona ...

History shows more big wildfires likely as climate warms

October 5, 2015

The history of wildfires over the past 2,000 years in a northern Colorado mountain range indicates that large fires will continue to increase as a result of a warming climate, according to new study led by a University of ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.