Study links guns and hormones in men

May 9, 2006

U.S. psychologists say they've found that handling a gun creates a hormonal reaction in men that can prime them for aggression.

Psychologists at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., enrolled 30 male students in what was presented as a taste study, The New York Times reported. The researchers took saliva samples from the students and measured testosterone levels.

The students were seated, one at a time, at a table in a bare room. On the table were pieces of paper and either the board game Mouse Trap or a large handgun. Their instructions: Take apart the game or the gun and write directions for assembly and disassembly.

Fifteen minutes later, the psychologists again measured testosterone levels and discovered high levels in men who had had handled the gun, with levels remaining steady in those working with the board game.

The students were then asked to taste a cup of water with a drop of hot sauce in it and prepare a similar drink for the next person in the experiment, adding as much hot sauce as they liked.

The psychologists said those handling the gun put in about three times as much hot sauce as the others.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: 'Gold standard' moms best at transmitting political ideologies, study finds

Related Stories

Recommended for you

How bees naturally vaccinate their babies

July 31, 2015

When it comes to vaccinating their babies, bees don't have a choice—they naturally immunize their offspring against specific diseases found in their environments. And now for the first time, scientists have discovered how ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

Exoplanets 20/20: Looking back to the future

July 31, 2015

Geoff Marcy remembers the hair standing up on the back of his neck. Paul Butler remembers being dead tired. The two men had just made history: the first confirmation of a planet orbiting another star.

Earth flyby of 'space peanut' captured in new video

July 31, 2015

NASA scientists have used two giant, Earth-based radio telescopes to bounce radar signals off a passing asteroid and produce images of the peanut-shaped body as it approached close to Earth this past weekend.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.