In Brief: Hawaii notes flaws in Kauai dams

May 21, 2006

Hawaii state inspectors have found all 54 dams on the island of Kauai are potentially dangerous, the Honolulu Star-Bulletin said.

The inspection reports, recently posted online, came after the Ka Loko Dam breached on March 14, killing seven people, the newspaper said.

In a summary of the inspection reports, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers concluded that none of the remaining dams had the potential for immediate breach or collapse.

But Lt. Colonel David Anderson said the results are valid only for the short duration of the inspections. Concerns for dam safety have mainly focused on poor maintenance, grass, bush and tree overgrowth and erosion, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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