Great Lakes invasive species studied

May 23, 2006

The longstanding problem of various invasive species entering the Great Lakes via the St. Lawrence Seaway is now gaining attention from scientists.

The National Academy of Sciences convened a committee of transportation, economic and environmental experts Tuesday to explore ways to halt the flow of unwanted creatures into the world's largest freshwater system, while not interfering with international shipping in the area, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported.

Most invaders enter the lakes in contaminated ballast water used to stabilize ships. Such ballast is often taken on at one port and dumped at another, the Journal-Sentinel said.

At least 180 invasive species have, so far, entered the Great Lakes and a new one is discovered about every six and a half months, the newspaper said, noting the world's ocean shipping industry is trying to develop technology that will decontaminate ships' ballast water tanks.

Conservationists are reportedly beginning to question the value of overseas shipping to the Great Lakes, given the ecological problems it is causing.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: NOAA: Warm oceans cause concern of coral bleaching

Related Stories

Air bubbles could keep rivers open for shipping

Apr 15, 2015

Researchers at EPFL have shown how air bubbles could keep sediments from obstructing bends in river waterways such as the Rhine River, which has to be dredged regularly to stay open for freight ships.

New requirements for ballast water dumped by ships

Mar 29, 2013

(AP)—The Environmental Protection Agency has issued new requirements for cleansing ballast water dumped from ships, which scientists believe has brought invasive species to U.S. waters that damage ecosystems and cost the ...

Recommended for you

Timber and construction, a well-matched couple

6 minutes ago

The IT 781-13 group (UPV/EHU) has for the last ten years been conducting research into building structures and materials (concrete, steel and timber). According to its latest research, timber is a very light, tough material ...

Alternatives for ag/urban water uses studied

55 minutes ago

Can agriculture remain viable and urban water needs be met in one area of fast-growing Northern Colorado? A two-and-a-half year study, funded by the Colorado Water Conservation Board and facilitated by Colorado State University's ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.